Where Does Deval Patrick Stand on the Issues?
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Where Does Deval Patrick Stand on the Issues?

Deval Patrick, the former governor of Massachusetts, in Ohio last year.Credit…Allison Farrand for The New York TimesNov. 13, 2019Updated 6:47 p.m. ETFormer Gov. Deval Patrick of Massachusetts is considering an 11th-hour entry into the 2020 Democratic primary. Here’s a look at his background and where he stands on some of the major issues in the race.Growing up on Chicago’s South SideMr. Patrick, 63, grew up in the 1950s and ’60s on Chicago’s South Side, then a neighborhood of Southern transplants, where he recalls being steeped in Southern culture and food, as well as Sundays given over to church services. (His speech retains a hint of a Southern cadence.) He also remembers being poor. His jazz musician father, Pat Patrick, was largely out of the picture. In a speech last year to the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland, Mr. Patrick told the story of how he, his mother and his sister, who were forced to move in to his grandparents’ two-bedroom tenement apartment, had to share a bunk bed in one of the rooms. “We would rotate from the top bunk to the bottom bunk to the floor, every third night on the floor,” he said.A pivotal moment in his life came when one of Mr. Patrick’s public middle-school teachers recognized his intellect and contacted a nonprofit agency to arrange for Mr. Patrick’s scholarship to Milton Academy in Massachusetts. From there, he went on to Harvard for both undergraduate studies and law school. After graduating, he worked as a lawyer for the N.A.A.C.P. Legal Defense and Educational Fund in the early 1980s, focusing primarily on death penalty and voting rights cases. He first encountered Bill Clinton, then the governor of Arkansas, when he sued him in a voting case. Mr. Clinton later appointed Mr. Patrick assistant attorney general for civil rights, the nation’s top civil rights post. Shifting into the private sector, Mr. Patrick became general counsel at Texaco, where he helped carry out a race discrimination settlement, and later took a top position at Coca-Cola.He declared his candidacy for governor in 2005 and ran as an outsider and heavy underdog who leveraged grass-roots support and excitement to soundly defeat two politically seasoned opponents in the Democratic primary, becoming the first black governor of Massachusetts. “I came here to change politics as usual,” Mr. Patrick said at the state Democrati

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