Court Rejects Trump’s Appeal in Fight to Keep Financial Records From Congress
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Court Rejects Trump’s Appeal in Fight to Keep Financial Records From Congress

Politics|Court Rejects Trump’s Appeal in Fight to Keep Financial Records From CongressThe decision almost certainly paves the way for a major Supreme Court case over President Trump’s stonewalling of congressional oversight efforts.An appeals court rejected President Trump’s latest attempt to keep his financial records private. Credit…T.J. Kirkpatrick for The New York TimesNov. 13, 2019Updated 9:39 p.m. ETWASHINGTON — A full federal appeals court on Wednesday let stand an earlier ruling that President Trump’s accounting firm must turn over eight years of his financial records to Congress, bringing the case to the threshold of a likely Supreme Court battle.In the latest of a string of court losses for Mr. Trump over his uncompromising vow to fight “all” subpoenas from Congress, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia rejected his request that it rehear a case in which he challenged the subpoena to the firm, Mazars USA. A panel of the court had sided with lawmakers in that earlier ruling.The president will now appeal to the Supreme Court, said a lawyer for Mr. Trump, Jay Sekulow. If the justices take the case, as seems likely, it would add another blockbuster case over separation of powers to the court’s current term, which ends in June — in the middle of the presidential election campaign.“In light of the well-reasoned dissent, we will be seeking review at the Supreme Court,” Mr. Sekulow said in a statement.Lawyers representing Mr. Trump had argued that Congress had no legitimate legislative authority to seek his business records because the panel seeking them, the House Oversight and Reform Committee, was primarily trying to determine whether he broke existing laws — not weighing whether to enact a new one.Lawyers for House Democrats rejected that argument, maintaining that it was well within Congress’s constitutional authority to seek the records — both as a matter of oversight and as it considered whether new presidential ethics and financial disclosure laws are necessary. A three-judge appeals court panel in October rejected that sweeping argument and upheld Congress’s authority to issue the subpoena by a 2-to-1 vote. But Mr. Trump petitioned the full court to erase that ruling and reconsider the case. The court on Wednesday rejected his request, 8 to

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